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December, 2016

“O, Canada!” at Hallmark Art Collection Gallery

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of William E. Coutts Co. Ltd, from which sprang today’s Hallmark Canada, Hallmark Art Collection presents a special exhibit of works by prominent Canadian artists. Many of these paintings and prints were collected over the years by William E. Coutts, who, in 1916, founded the Toronto-based greeting card company that would become Coutts Hallmark, and, eventually, Hallmark Canada. Over the span

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August, 2016

“Word: the Art of Language” Now on View

This exhibition features contemporary art devoted to word play. The paintings, sculptures and prints on display represent a cross-section of artists working today at the fertile intersection of art and language. Focusing our attention on words— often words alone—they convey a broad array of messages, from the poignant to the absurd. Among the artists included are Robert Cottingham, Leslie Dill, Nancy Dwyer, Jasper Johns, Bruce Nauman, Tim Rollins & K.O.S.,

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December, 2015

Featured Acquisition: David Wojnarowicz

Hallmark Art Collection is pleased to announce the acquisition of a major work by artist, writer and activist David Wojnarowicz. Biography of Peter Hujar (7 Miles a Second) is a moving tribute to Wojnarowicz’s close friend and mentor, painted shortly after Hujar passed away due to complications from AIDS. The work is especially notable for the inclusion of the mathematical formula for “escape velocity” (7 miles/second), the speed at which

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November, 2015

“Op Art in America” on View Now

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, artists around the world became fascinated with the subject of visual perception. Their interest was spurred by recent advances in perceptual psychology and the science of optics, which together proved that vision was a product of both the eye and the mind. To test the boundaries of perception, they made paintings with pulsating patterns and dynamic color contrasts that stimulated profound optical effects.

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